0FFICE 2010

DOWNLOAD NOW

dropbox.com


mediafire.com


4shared.com


zippyshare.com

There are fun moments where the "rabbids in your living room" concept comes together, like when you roll around to avoid spotlights cast by circling UFOs. But for every clever mission, there's a missed opportunity, such as an air guitar performance that fails to offer half the charm of musical sequences featured in games released four or five years ago. You should look elsewhere if you want to get a real kick out of the rabbids. You stand in utter blackness. At your feet lies a sphere of light. It emits a radiant glow that hints at safety, peace. However, the darkness ahead, behind, above, below you is anything but. A prompt urges you to pick up this light source. You cradle it in your arms and walk forward. The path lights up. Where once only darkness existed, now there's light and solid ground to walk upon. Behind you, darkness swallows what used to be a safe path. Behind you, there's only death. So you walk forward, shining the light to slowly reveal the path before you. Committing to your plans without knowing how they might unfold gets dicey because there's a fine line between a flesh wound and a pile of mercenaries bleeding out on the ground. Even when they're well armed and armored, your mercs are painfully fragile. It doesn't take many hits from a decent-size weapon to take down one of your crew, and fallen comrades that aren't revived fast enough will die permanently. Losing favorite mercs you’ve grown attached to isn’t just emotionally draining, it’s absolutely disastrous in certain stretches of the campaign. In Wargame, you can zoom out to a bird's-eye view reminiscent of Supreme Commander, at which point all the units turn into their respective standard NATO military symbols. Icons appear over units when they are running low on fuel or ammo or when they are in danger of being routed. If you pull the camera in closer, red text above the unit informs you of various problems and how long these effects will persist. For example, a shot-up helicopter may have the message "fuel leak 20 seconds" above it, or a tank may be cursed by "damaged tracks 5 seconds." Cast a spell using the magic wheel in the centre of the screen, and you have to follow the magic tile; miss one of its commands, and you fail to cast the spell and forfeit any mana used in the attempt. All this happens in real time, so you have to flick between tiles constantly, which introduces an element of strategy. Knowing when to cast a spell, mount a defence, or gather mana is key to a successful battle. It can get incredibly frantic, particularly when fighting against higher-level monsters, but the system is so fluid it's always heaps of fun. It can be frustrating when things start to go wrong; you'll be tearing your hair out trying to understand how your side managed six wins in a row, yet all of a sudden, it can't find the net with the exact same tactics and starting lineup. There’s an occasional sensation that the game is playing you, that if you start doing too well the wheels will inevitably come off. Then, just as you’re on the brink of hitting reset it throws you a bone. To misquote the immortal words of Michael Corleone, "Just when you thought you were out, it pulls you back in." Unfortunately, almost all of Downpour's accomplishments are marred by some persistent frame rate and stuttering issues. They occur throughout nearly the entire game but are most noticeable in the larger environments, such as the town itself. At times, they are excusable, such as when the game is loading a new environment or autosaving. But when simply looking from side to side causes small hiccups and screen tearing, they become real issues. This happens much less often in smaller, interior spaces, but it is something you have to endure throughout. As you work through the stages, you score points for every item you consume. There's more to eat in each stage than you need to devour to progress, and the game maintains leaderboards to track who scores the most points by finishing fastest with the most mass. Every level also has two "friends" hidden away, which means that stages have decent replay value if you're competitive or just want to find everything. If you just rush through every area and don't worry about collecting everything, you can probably finish the adventure in four or five hours. The War of the Worlds is disappointing because it had so much potential. Many elements of the presentation are begging to be in a better game, but it feels like a product that was ushered out the door before it could be properly balanced and tweaked. If you're the kind of person who fondly remembers the demanding, brutally difficult moments in old games like Karateka, the first few hours of The War of the Worlds might stimulate some nostalgic reminiscing. But you're better off replaying those classics and letting the aliens win this particular war. WRC 2 fails to make many improvements on the first World Rally Championship game. It doesn't address many of the original game's flaws and adds very little new content, except for updating the cars and drivers to the 2011 WRC season. The car handling, visual detail, and game modes are all largely unchanged, resulting in a game that feels like a missed opportunity rather than a successful sequel. Followers of the real sport will appreciate the new Super Special Stages, but most racing game fans will be disappointed by the lack of thrills and frills. WRC 2 fails to make many improvements on the first World Rally Championship game. It doesn't address many of the original game's flaws and adds very little new content, except for updating the cars and drivers to the 2011 WRC season. The car handling, visual detail, and game modes are all largely unchanged, resulting in a game that feels like a missed opportunity rather than a successful sequel. Followers of the real sport will appreciate the new Super Special Stages, but most racing game fans will be disappointed by the lack of thrills and frills. It's also packed with action. The basic third-person shooting is the same as Mass Effect 2's, though it has been given a few minor tweaks. You can now deliver a charged-up melee attack, for example, and slide around corners while still in cover. Such mechanics don't drastically change the flow of battle, which is still occasionally sullied by returning Mass Effect combat quirks: occasional cover glitches, unintelligent friendlies that crouch on top of crates, and enemies that thoughtlessly tumble against walls and end up going nowhere as a result. It's also packed with action. The basic third-person shooting is the same as Mass Effect 2's, though it has been given a few minor tweaks. You can now deliver a charged-up melee attack, for example, and slide around corners while still in cover. Such mechanics don't drastically change the flow of battle, which is still occasionally sullied by returning Mass Effect combat quirks: occasional cover glitches, unintelligent friendlies that crouch on top of crates, and enemies that thoughtlessly tumble against walls and end up going nowhere as a result. It's also packed with action. The basic third-person shooting is the same as Mass Effect 2's, though it has been given a few minor tweaks. You can now deliver a charged-up melee attack, for example, and slide around corners while still in cover. Such mechanics don't drastically change the flow of battle, which is still occasionally sullied by returning Mass Effect combat quirks: occasional cover glitches, unintelligent friendlies that crouch on top of crates, and enemies that thoughtlessly tumble against walls and end up going nowhere as a result. Combat involves switching between these three groups as you skillfully circle around the arenas. Elemental traps make walking blindly a deadly affair, so you have to move with precision if you want to avoid your opponents' strikes while landing retaliatory blows of your own. When your goblins are attacked they fall stunned to the ground, and you can revive them simply by walking over their prone bodies. If they stay on the ground too long, they eventually perish, and you need to purchase new goblins at special chambers to grow your army once more. It's easy to accidentally trigger this last weapon while just trying to comfortably hold the Vita, at least until you've done so a few times and become aware of the importance of keeping your fingers away from the touch pad. The alternative to the Delta option is called Pure, which does away with all